How to use SRS for radio comms on the 4YA WWII Project Overlord server

Flying on the Project Overlord DCS server can seem like a lonely and unfulfilling experience at first. The sky is big and empty, flak batteries sometimes open up on you without warning and you’ve no real idea of where you are or where you’re meant to be flying.

This is where DCS Simple Radio Standalone, also known as SRS, comes in. SRS is freeware that adds voice radio functionality to our aeroplanes. It means you can talk to other pilots on your side to find out where the enemy is flying or to call for help if you get jumped by a hostile fighter.

This brief guide will explain how to install and configure SRS for use on PO.

Finding and downloading SRS

Go to http://dcssimpleradio.com/ and download the required files from there. Exit DCS if it is running, then run the SRS installer per the instructions.

To fly with radio communications on the Project Overlord DCS server you only need the client version of SRS. Don’t worry about installing or configuring the server version of SRS.

Once installed, open the SRS client. You will see a window that looks like this:

The details you need to enter are the IP address and port number. These are currently (January 2023): 141.94.200.37:30201

Once you have entered the IP and port number, put a name into the “EAM name” box. This is the name other players will see flashing up whenever you transmit on SRS. It should be the same as your in-game DCS name.

You don’t need to fill in any other boxes.

You can save the server IP address details using the Favourites tab in the SRS window, so if you are connecting to different servers with SRS enabled you have the required IP and port number available with the click of a mouse.

The final thing you need to do is set a PTT (push to talk) button in the SRS Controls window.

Using SRS inside the DCS game itself

The beauty of SRS is that it interfaces directly with the radios in your aeroplane. You don’t need to touch SRS itself other than opening it when you load DCS. If you enable auto-connect, under the SRS Settings window, it will connect to the relevant SRS server when you join the associated DCS multiplayer server. Clever, isn’t it!

Allied and German fighters both have four-channel radios in their cockpits. The radio box in the Spitfire, P-47 and P-51 is the British TR.1154 set and it looks like this:

The radio has four buttons labelled A-D.

Channel A is used for Airfield communications such as announcements of takeoffs and landings.

Channel B is for Battle communications, such as callouts of enemy locations, requests for help, and so on.

Change from A to B 1-2 minutes after takeoff, and change back to A within 2 miles of an airfield if you intend landing or overflying at low level.

In German aircraft the radio looks like this:

The radio above is the Fw190A radio but the installation is the same in the other German fighters. The top knob selects one of four channels: I, II, Triangle and Square.

Channel II is used for Airfield communications such as announcements of takeoffs and landings.

Channel Triangle is for Battle communications, such as callouts of enemy locations, requests for help, and so on.

Change from II to Triangle 1-2 minutes after takeoff, and change back to A within 2 miles of an airfield if you intend landing or overflying at low level.

Channel Square is spare and can be used by anyone. Channel I is not used.

The bottom knob is the volume knob. If you cannot hear anything on SRS check the volume is fully turned up.

On the Project Overlord server it is mandatory for all players to be using either SRS (DCS Simple Radio Standalone) or text chat. This is to encourage team play and cooperative flying to complete the mission objectives.

What is the radio procedure like on Project Overlord?

Radio use is fairly informal. It is normal for most players to call for a radio check when starting up their aircraft to test that everything is working OK. This is done by pressing the PTT and saying “Radio check”.

The normal reply from other players is either “loud and clear” or “five by five”, where each number refers to strength and readability. The lower the number, the quieter and less clearly you can be heard.

Mandatory radio calls include takeoffs and landings. This type of call loosely follows modern aviation practice. For example, you might say: “Single P-51 runway 19 taking off at Criqueville”. Other players rely on these callouts to help avoid collisions, which can be extremely frustrating for regular players.

It is the custom for players to call out other aircraft seen in the air on SRS to positively identify them. There are a few ways to do this clearly and concisely.

Enemy aircraft are known as “bandits”. Unidentified contacts are called “bogeys”. You might say “two bogeys spotted north of Falaise”.

On the Allied side, height is referred to in thousands of feet as “angels”. You might say “two bogeys spotted north of Falaise at angels 10”. On the German side, the term is “Kirchturm” (kERsh-toourm) and refers to hundreds of metres. “Kirchturm 25” means 2,500 metres high.

It is normal to also give a compass direction, so: “Two bogeys north of Caen at angels 10 heading north-west”.

Good practice includes calling out your intentions if you’re going off on a mission. “Single 109 taking off runway 30 Argentan with bomb to strike target 3”, for example.

Most other situations are catered for in plain English: “Spitfire over Caen, break now!” or “help, 109 on my six o’clock over St Lo!”